University of Tartu (Estonian Biobank) Joins DARWIN EU® Network to Support Europe’s Public Health, Medicine Regulation and Safety with Collected Health Data

University of Tartu (Estonian Biobank) Joins DARWIN EU® Network to Support Europe's Public Health, Medicine Regulation and Safety with Collected Health Data
Raivo Kolde (on the right) discusses the results of a recent study with Research Fellow Sulev Reisberg. (Photo credit: University of Tartu)
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The European Medicines Agency (EMA) has chosen the University of Tartu as one of the data partners for the DARWIN EU® network. This partnership marks the beginning of a collaborative effort to utilize health data across Europe, with the aim of using evidence-based data from routine healthcare to support public health, medicine regulation, and safety.

“Health information on the use of medicines from different countries is urgently needed to support and improve public health, and in addition cross-country analysis has so far been hampered by data compatibility issues. Our researchers are working every day to solve these problems, and this is certainly one of the reasons why we were included in the network,” said Raivo Kolde, Associate Professor of Health Informatics at the Institute of Computer Science.

Raivo Kolde believes that becoming a part of the DARWIN EU® data network is not only a significant acknowledgment of the efforts made but also a valuable chance for Estonia to collaborate on a global scale in the healthcare sector.

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Following the accession process, the health data of Estonia will be incorporated into a broader network of real-world data, which will have an impact on patient care throughout Europe by providing evidence-based insights on the use, safety, and effectiveness of medications.

The Estonian Biobank‘s exceptional database, which combines genetic and health data from more than 200,000 Estonians has played a key role in enabling inclusion in the DARWIN EU® network.

“Thanks to the biobank, it will be possible to discover and validate new drug candidates, assess the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of medicines already on the market, and create drug guidelines that take into account genetic specificities,” said Professor Tõnu Esko, Head of Estonian Biobank Innovation Centre at the University of Tartu.